Posted by Chuck on January 27, 2019
Credit Cards

Published on January 27th, 2019 | by Chuck

97

Chase Credit Cards Going Contactless [Sapphire Reserve Added]

Update: Chase Sapphire Reserve now has a contactless option.

Update: Chase has sent out an official press release regarding contactless cards. A few key points:

  • All Chase Visa credit cards, including all co-brand cards, will have tap-to-pay functionality by the first half of 2019,
  • Chase debit cards will offer the tap to pay feature in the second half of 2019.

Looks like cards are in two categories:

  • December 2018
    • AARP Credit Card from Chase
    • British Airways Visa Signature® Card
    • Chase Freedom® Credit Card
    • Chase Freedom Unlimited® Credit Card
    • Chase Slate® Credit Card
    • The World of Hyatt Credit Card
    • Starbucks Rewards™ Visa® Card
    • UnitedSM Explorer Card
    • UnitedSM TravelBank Card
    • UnitedSM MileagePlus® Card
    • UnitedSM MileagePlus® Club Card
    • UnitedSM MileagePlus® Explorer Business Card
  • 2019
    • Amazon Rewards Visa Signature Card
    • Disney® Premier Visa® Card
    • Disney® Visa® Card
    • Ink Business Unlimited Credit Card
    • Ink Business CashSM Credit Card
    • Ink Business PreferredSM Credit Card
    • Marriott Rewards® Premier Plus Credit Card
    • Marriott Rewards® Premier Plus Business Credit Card
    • Chase Sapphire Preferred® Credit Card
    • Chase Sapphire Reserve® Credit Card
    • Southwest Rapid Rewards® Priority Credit Card
    • Southwest Rapid Rewards® Plus Credit Card
    • Southwest Rapid Rewards® Premier Credit Card
    • Southwest Rapid Rewards® Premier Business Credit Card

Original Post:

Chase is announcing Contactless Payments coming to Chase Visa cards. Contactless payments allows you to pay by tapping your card on eligible payment terminals instead of swiping or inserting the card. Saves a bit of time, and a lot of people find it useful when traveling abroad, especially.

We recently wrote about Chase Slate going contactless, and it now seems it’ll be rolling out to other Chase cards as well. Reddit members are hearing from Chase reps that there’ll be a mailer being sent out about this, with new cards being issued possibly after November 15th.

In the FAQ, it states: We’ll begin issuing contactless cards in 2018 on an ongoing basis. If you’d like to order a contactless card prior to your card’s expiration date, please call the number on the back of your card.

Related: Capital One Credit Cards go Contactless (No Swiping or Inserting Needed)



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MoreSun
MoreSun

YAZZZZ!!!

Red
Red

Can’t wait for the consumer complaints because a dumb paranoid person has trouble using their card because they have one of those scam RFID-blocking wallets

not scam
not scam

RFID blocking is not a scam. The contact-less stuff can be read FROM A SHORT DISTANCE. Duh.

SamSimon
SamSimon

“scam RFID-blocking wallets” can you elaborate a bit? thanks!

Emporio
Emporio

It’s possible to wirelessly scan a victim’s RFID enabled credit card and capture the card data if a criminal is within close proximity and has a (most likely concealed) scanner.

sloebrake
sloebrake

And they’ve been hawking them shows popular with older folks for at least a decade, even though almost no person in the US had one (or currently even has one) until ~2 years ago, let alone the elderly.

I’ve over 30 credit cards and only 1 has it, I just got it 3 months ago, and it’s a business card (Little Old Ladies aren’t a big target for business credit cards)

wrong
wrong

You are mistaken. As an example mentioned just a few comments above, Chase Blink was made available in 2005. Visa PayWave, Mobil Speedpass, etc, all using RFID without any encryption and easily copied using a homemade scanner from a short distance. All US passports have had a RFID chip (without any security) for about a decade now.

Chucks
Chucks

That’s incorrect. There was an initial rollout in the US at leaast 10 years ago, more than that reading comments. The Amex Blue (the old blue) had it for some time- the clear card design even made it possible to see the RFID circuitry. It was dropped in later iterations, probably because of security concerns.

Ann
Ann

You’re not supposed to try to use RFID cards to pay while they’re still in your wallet anyway, unless you only ever carry one card.

Quinn Tebirkes
Quinn Tebirkes

I’m annoyed that I have to take my wallet out of my pocket to tap the reader at ticket gates to the extent I shove my torso against the reader so I don’t have to.

reader1234
reader1234

Can this be disabled by punching a hole thru the rfid chip?

Lrdx
Lrdx

You might as well ask the bank for a card without. But to be honest, why bother?

Beefer
Beefer

It’s used to be a security issue. Someone could download an app on their phone and brush up against you in a store and get all of your card info.

They could also pop a more high-powered device in a backpack and get more range than brushing up against you.

However, the latest generation of RFID cards does encrypt so it’s no longer an issue. Still a fear for a lot of people.

They run specials around christmas every year, fear mongering this.

cpaynter
cpaynter

LOL, I had to do the opposite last month with CapOne. Wife had gotten a $30 cash offer for using her QuickSilver contactless nine times. I looked at my QuickSilver and it didn’t have the contactless option. Hoping to be able to cash in on the contactless offer, I called CapOne customer service and had to convince them that my QuickSilver lacked the option and have them send me a new card. I was only partly successful; I got a new card with contactless, but I still was not targeted for the offer. 🙁

Chris.

Emporio
Emporio

Haha yes the hole punching method would work to disable the chip. You could also wrap the card in tin foil to block the chip transmission if you are looking to make a statement whenever you pull out the card.

Mike L
Mike L

AKA the poor man’s Platinum.

Igor
Igor

To be extra safe, you should also wrap your head in tin foil.

Harold
Harold

How is this different from Chase Blink?

security
security

Blink was as insecure as the mag strip. The contactless capability of chipped cards is supposed to use the chip, so each transaction is encrypted and unique (cannot be replayed).

cpaynter
cpaynter

It isn’t any different. Blink is just what Chase called this when they first introduced it over a decade ago. Not sure if they’ll persist in using that name this time around.

Mystral
Mystral

If it carries any branding at all, it’ll probably be Visa payWave.

Mark
Mark

My IHG card still isn’t eligible for Apple Pay lol

ChocoHobo
ChocoHobo

About damned time, Canada has had these awesome cards for over 6 years now.

lenin1991
lenin1991

Several US issuers (including Citi and Chase) issued contactless cards starting around 2005, but there were no terminals that accepted them other than like McDonald’s and a handful other places. So inertia on both ends prevented uptake: merchants didn’t want to pay for upgrades, and consumers saw no benefit if they were even aware.

In much of Europe, the benefit of contactless for smaller purchases is no need to enter PIN. If this means I won’t need to sign, this will be great!

Lrdx
Lrdx

You already don’t need to sign..

Charlie
Charlie

Nevertheless, many merchants still require a signature. I made transactions at 5 merchants yesterday and had to sign for 2.

Vy
Vy

OP is probably referring to RFID cards that are chip-and-PIN.

US-issued credit cards are still using the antiquated chip-and-signature system, which is slightly less useless than a no-chip card with a magnetic strip.

Paul
Paul

All four mayor US networks dropped the signature requirement several months ago. When you encounter it, as you frequently do, it’s because the merchant has not updated.

no

that’s not true our machines are updated when updates come out and were told as long as the line prints we are required to have a signature until new chips chip cards are placed and the option is removed from the chip

tmiw

You still have to sign basically every time overseas unless you use Apple Pay or equivalent. Or apparently Chase’s new cards if you tap them now.

no

that’s not turn some merchant processors still require a signature because of how the original chips were handout out they expect this to disappear as the new chip cards get replaced

John
John

Im happy. I hate being “that guy” in line when Im traveling in Europe with the 1980s payment tech. I would be faster to take an old fashioned imprint sometimes with the confusion it causes in some places. The self checkout machines also go bonkers sometimes flashing “must show ID”. Look forward to the end of that.

NeGourmand
NeGourmand

Never mind this is round 2 for contactless in the US. It failed the first time around, over a decade ago.

Gino
Gino

I think with Apple, Samsung, and Google boldly adopting NFC payments on all of their newer model phones, merchants have been more willing to adopt. The cost of technology to enable acceptance has also gotten much cheaper than a decade ago, and even small businesses can accept contactless payments for little investment through things like Square. Hopefully, when we finally start to embrace Chip and PIN as primary verification in another 5 or so years, contactless will be pretty well ingrained throughout the US to make smaller purchases quick and convenient.

escot
escot

but NOT everywhere…. Take Lenovo/Motorolla…. No NFC, for example on all the otherwise very popular E4/E5 and G5/G6 phones. (It’s been on their international models, curiously, but not in US)

In any case, to the premise of your observation, I presume one doesn’t need an NFC enabled phone to use these new contactless Chase cards. No? If so, then isn’t Chase bypassing the whole NFC/phone issue.? (as they did with Chase pay?)

tmiw

Motorola’s explanation IIRC is that there’s little demand from Americans for stuff like Google Pay, hence no need to include it on US phones. Which, considering the stuff I’ve read about Apple Pay usage, doesn’t seem completely off base.

Anyway, maybe having it on physical cards will eventually lead to wider usage of phones to pay.

Creditian
Creditian

Well, it’s more than 10 years in Asia while it was called VISA Wave rather than VISA payWave. Canada is far behind Asia so don’t try to laugh at US.

Electroman
Electroman

It’s been in the US for over fifteen years, so laugh away! 😉

Eddie B
Eddie B

Wow…I remember my Chase Freedom having this a few years back. When I got an iPhone 6, I stopped using it in favor of Apple Pay.

I had no idea they even stopped issuing their cards with it, but sure enough, I see that my newest Freedom card doesn’t have it and found an article that says they discontinued it in 2014 due to low usage/acceptance.

deerseason
deerseason

I remember this too and find it funny that they’re only bringing it back now. I tried to use tap-to-pay once or twice on a newer Freedom a while back and was surprised to find it no longer worked.

Nick
Nick

Anyone have a list of eligible cards?

Lrdx
Lrdx

Any Visa card, as stated in the announcement. That would exclude Mastercards (IHG?).

I would assume personal cards only, at least initially.

mk712
mk712

If they will be making this standard on all cards then I’m curious how they’ll deal with the metal cards, as I don’t believe I’ve ever seen a contactless metal card.

For example you can request a contactless Amex Plat, but it’ll be plastic rather than metal.

Skipjack
Skipjack

The just-rebranded AMEX Gold Card is contactless metal.

BX
BX

My AMEX Contactless Gold is metal. I use it instead of Apple Pay everyday.

Borkus
Borkus

My wife’s Amex Plat is contactless and heavy metal.

Gino
Gino

I was told when I changed from regular Plat to MB Plat that they were no longer offering the plastic contactless cards (which I much preferred). I wonder if they’ll introduce a metal contactless version for Plat now that Gold has it.

Marshall Jackson

I have an Amex Platinum contactless card. I called them and asked for it, but they sent me one this past June. It is metal and contactless.

Helang
Helang

How about the Ritz card

Eric
Eric

Chuck,

I just tried to post this long comment in the “Swell” thread and I received this message: “We are sorry, you are not allowed to comment more than one time!”. I’ve never seen this before. Is this new that you only allow each person to comment once per post?

I decided to put this comment in your newest post to make sure you would see it.

Anyway, I think you misunderstood my comment. I wasn’t trying to criticize you for missing all of those duplicate links.

Whenever I read a new comment in this thread (I’ve randomly read 10 or 15 of them) it sends me to the oldest comments and I see your reply to kevin: “[link removed. Don’t post your link multiple times. Don’t post your link as a reply]”.

I wrongly assumed that you were checking each link posted for duplicates before allowing it to go through. After reading lingua’s reply to me I realized that you were just checking to make sure that people only posted their link and nothing else. I guess kevin’s attempts were so blatant that you couldn’t help but notice. Do I have that right?

William Charles,

Is there any way to implement lingua’s idea? lingua has 273 comments and I recognize their screen name as being a quality reader. If you limited people with let’s say 250 comments or more to post referral links I think that would get rid of a lot of this tomfoolery. What do you think?

William Charles

No, there is no way to implement it so that only people with a high amount of comments can post. If readers start using only links from readers that they recognize then it will become less of an issue

cpaynter
cpaynter

Well, I just hope this ushers in a bunch of “make three contactless purchases and get a $10 statement credit” offers or similar offers like when they were pushing this “modern” technology ten years ago (I see a $10 statement credit on my Freedom card in September 2008). That’s the only reason I would have used contactless payments back then and that (or extra cashback) is the only reason i would use it now.

Honestly, I thought this was dead with the advent of Google Pay/Samsung Pay/Apple Pay. With those, you have the added benefit of not having to be carrying the card. With this, you still need the card in your pocket, so really, what’s the point?

Getting 4.5% cashback on mobile pay transactions is the only reason I use Google Pay/Samsung Pay. I just don’t see any other advantage over just using the plastic directly. But if they throw some statement credits my way for using it, hey, I’ll bite.

Chris.

Davy
Davy

The point is ease of use for consumers that don’t want to use a mobile wallet. There are many folks that don’t want to hassle with loading and verifying cards in mobile wallets.

TomJ
TomJ

Sorry if this is off topic but how are you getting 4.5% using GooglePay/Samsung Pay?

Lrdx
Lrdx

US Bank Altitude.

Cpaynter
Cpaynter

USBank Altitude Visa. 3ppd on mobile pay transactions. 1.5x redemption
of points against travel purchases. Works out to effectively 4.5% for me. You do have to be able to find travel purchases to redeem against, but for better or worse, that’s not an issue for us.

Chris.

Whatever
Whatever

I do not like contactless cards because they have to add a thick plastic backing to metal cards for it to work. Takes the allure away from metal cards imo.

Ann
Ann

Ew. People have been asking if it’s available on metal cards… sounds like it technically is, but only by sandwiching a plastic card onto your metal card, kind of defeating the purpose.

Emporio
Emporio

How is it “Contactless” if the card has to make contact with the payment terminal by tapping it? They should call it what it is which is a RFID or NFC (Near Field Communication) payment. At least Chase didn’t hire anyone from the Hyatt marketing team or it’d be called “Contactlesist” payments in the same vein as Hyatt’s rebranded rewards tiers Discoverist and Explorist.

Ann
Ann

That’s kinda like saying that ‘wireless’ charging isn’t wireless because it still has a wire from the charging pad to the outlet. 😉 I think you don’t literally have to tap (touch) the PIN pad, just get the card very close to it (within half an inch? quarter inch?). Oh, speaking of somewhat-misleading naming, they should take after ‘hoverboards’ and call this ‘hover pay’! 😉

Emporio
Emporio

“Hover pay” is clever. Chase should hire you for its branding!

Lrdx
Lrdx

I used my contactless card without taking it out of my wallet.

Too bad today I have like 10 cards in my wallet, and if all were contactless and I paid like that that would be some random card (I guess the one that has the best reception)

BK
BK

Is this available on metal cards?

Nick
Nick

I spoke with customer service and the rep read me the entire memo. It basically said that all cards will be migrated beginning November 15th, on and after this date if you request a replacement it will automatically be contactless. All plastic cards that are Chase branded are eligible, it said stay tuned for news about partner cards. It specifically said the JP Morgan Reserve and Chase Sapphire Reserve contactless options are only available in plastic. This is what I was told by the rep, take it with a grain of salt.

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